PhD student / Post Doc - changes in environmental and oceanic DSi concentrations through geologic time



We are searching for a PhD student and a Post Doc to explore the changes in environmental and oceanic DSi concentrations through geologic time. The person will utilize stable silica isotope measurements to investigate biosilicification in fossil material from deep time together with supporting geochemical and geological proxies.

The positions are based at Lund University and are part of a larger interdisciplinary research project in collaboration with Jarone Pinhassi's research group at the Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial model Systems (EEMiS) at Linnaeus University.

The PhD position is for a 4-years and comes with full Swedish social security benefits. Further details can be found here: https://lu.mynetworkglobal.com/en/what:job/jobID:242049/

The Post Doctoral position is for at least 2 years with full Swedish social security benefits. Further details can be found here: https://lu.mynetworkglobal.com/en/what:job/jobID:240156/

The application process is open until 15 January 2019.

Context:

It is widely recognized that the emergence and expansion of silica biomineralization in the oceans has affected evolutionary competition for dissolved Si (DSi). This resulted in changes in the global biogeochemical cycles of silica, carbon and other nutrients that regulate ocean productivity and ultimately climate. Today, low DSi reflects its efficient uptake by pelagic silicifiers, principally diatoms. However, little is known about how shifting DSi concentrations from biological uptake have changed in the oceans during the last billion years of Earth's history. In addition, the inputs of DSi, especially from weathering and tectonic processes, has varied over time. The major goal of the overall project is to investigate the interactions between biosilicification in organisms and the environment and how these interactions have evolved through Earth's history.
(https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2017.00397).

Contact:

Daniel Conley
Professor in Biogeochemistry
Department of Geology
Lund University, Sweden
Email: daniel.conley@geol.lu.se

published: 17 December 2018     Please mention EARTHWORKS when responding to this advertisement.